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The clocks are going back!

You'll get an extra hour in bed on Sunday as British Summer Time ends

The clocks are going back!
Time machine ... Big Ben will be adjusted by one hour to reflect the end of British Summer Time

IF you’re spending your first winter in the UK you might not know that something a bit weird is going to happen in the early hours of Sunday,30 October.

It’s the official end of British Summer Time and at 02:00 on Sunday the official time will become 01:00. If you’re from a country that doesn’t use a system of daylight saving time (DST) this might seem a bit strange. On Sunday morning, all over the UK, people will adjust their clocks and watches (don’t forget the clock on the microwave), moving the time back by exactly one hour to stay in line with Greenwich Mean Time (GMT).

It means the evenings will be darker until the clocks are put forward again on  Sunday 26 March, 2017.

So, if you wake up on Sunday morning at 8am (and you haven’t already changed your watch) it will actually be 7am. You can go back to sleep for an hour! Remember to change all the clocks and watches in your house or you might get caught out. Businesses such as cinemas will have already adjusted their opening and screening times so change your watch or you’ll turn up an hour early.

So, the good news is you get an extra hour in bed. But the end of British Summer Time also means that the evenings will be darker from now on which can be a bit depressing!

I hear you asking, so why does the UK use DST?

The reason for moving clocks forward at the start of summer is to increase the amount of daylight in the evenings and reduce the amount of daylight in the morning. As the days shorten again in autumn and winter, sunrises get later and later, meaning that people could be waking up and spending a significant portion of their mornings in the dark. The solution is to move the clocks back by an hour, returning them to GMT.

If you’ve got an questions about the end of British Summer Time go to this government site.

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